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Govt in the dark over firing of nationals from Canadian firm
 
2009-05-03 16:59:44
By Rodgers Luhwago, Dodoma

The abrupt termination of contract of Tanzanian members in the board of directors of the Canadian Artumas Company operating in the southern part of the country has caught the Government unawares.

The Deputy Minister for Energy and Minerals, Adam Malima (pictured), admitted in an interview that he was uninformed of the claims that Tanzanians representing the government in the Artumas board of directors were discontinued without prior explanation.

Mchinga constituency legislator Mudhihir Mohammed Mudhihir told legislators in Dodoma this week that all Tanzanians representing the country in the board were withdrawn, and the company Chief Executive Officer (CEO) representing the firm in the country, Peter Gathcal, was fired.

According to Mudhihir, the president of the company at the headquarters in Canada, Steve Marson, was also fired. However, Mudhihir hinted in the Parliament that it was possible that the company made such a decision after being hit hard by the world`s economic crisis.

He explained that Tanzanian workers employed by the company were experiencing the same ordeal. He mentioned Tanzanians expelled from the board of directors as Reynald Mrope who is the MP for Masasi constituency, Abdurahman Kinana, Arnold Kileo and Mudhihir himself. Mudhihir claimed that the firing of the workers and the board members jeopardised the implementation of the multibillion power project that the company is undertaking.

``We, as the government, are not aware of what Mudhihir is saying. We do not know his source of information.

However, we will work on it to find out what exactly happened,`` said Malima when asked by The Guardian On Sunday to comment on the matter.

Canada`s Artumas Group Inc. which is executing a 300-megawatt natural gas-fired project is expected to generate power at Mnazi Bay and transmit it to the national grid. The project is expected to cost $700 million.

  • SOURCE: Sunday Observer
 
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